Tag Archives: pvc

Handyman Menorah (DIY “Man-orah” for dorm or home)

Manorahoutsidewick

PVC and pine Menorah

A “Man-orah.”  100%  hardware, rough and ready.  Instant.  Cheap.  Uncomplicated.   Just hacksaw 18.5″ off the end of a pine 1×3, slap some glue on 9 PVC fittings and you’re done.  No need to sand the splinters or remove the printed SKU# with acetone.  That’s for sissies.  LED tealights mean this bad boy is safe for the strictest dorm rooms (“no naked flames”), but Continue reading

Advertisements

PVC Menorah kit for kids, revised

PVC Menorah, ready to disassemble and reassemble

The finished PVC menorah worked beautifully at the Chanukah Carnival.  The volunteer who staffed that station devised a great ploy to generate interest: he left it half-assembled and then asked kids if they would like to “help finish it.”   They sure did.  Boys and girls, I am pleased to report, in seemingly even numbers.  Leaving it half-built was a wise move.  This left just enough of the structure up to entice would-be builders, yet not enough to look finished (and therefore not as alluring).  If he had disassembled the whole thing between turns, the kids would have seen nothing to draw them to the table.

Setup: I put everything on a huge baking tray on a card table.  The tray was the working surface, and the raised sides (like a jellyroll pan) kept pieces from Continue reading

PVC Menorah: advice needed

 

my DIY PVC menorah, so far

my DIY PVC menorah, so far

EDIT: Please see the finished version at PVC Menorah Kit for kids, revised. It turned out SO WELL. Kids love taking it apart and putting it back together (and so do I).

PVC Menorah, ready to disassemble and reassemble

finished PVC Menorah, ready to disassemble and reassemble!

For the synagogue’s Chanukah Carnival this year, I want to add a Build a Menorah station for kids. The goal: to assemble a menorah from bits of PVC pipe, and then to “light” it with hardware or pipe caps.  They don’t get to keep the menorah and it won’t actually work (as in, it isn’t wired and it isn’t fire-safe for candles).  No, the real goal is the process: for kids to figure out how all the pieces can fit together properly, and then to take them apart for the next person to try.  They can choose to make a 7-branch Temple Menorah or a 9-branch Hanukkah Menorah (Hanukkiyah). Continue reading