Category Archives: Jewish Bedtime for kids

Jewish Bedtime Rituals for families

Bedtime Sh’ma Coloring Book with your child’s photo

InterfaithFamily.com (which is a great site, by the way, full of info and ideas and community) just posted an article about making bedtime Jewish written by Chief Education Officer Karen Kushner, with a link to a free pdf booklet: “Goodnight, Sleep Tight: Jewish Rituals for Your Interfaith Family.”

I am delighted Jewish bedtime is getting attention. Transforming the nightly routine into something Jewish is easy: just add a new element or two–something that feels comfortable and genuine. Whether a family is interfaith or not: it doesn’t matter: what matters is that at least one parent is committed to making every day (and night) more Jewish.

Please see my Jewish Bedtime post for a detailed breakdown of every step of a typical bedtime progression, with plenty of suggestions about how to inject a bit of Jewishness. Continue reading

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The Best Bedtime Sh’ma Book

best bedtime Shema book, even though it isn't a Shema book...

best bedtime Shema book, even though it isn’t about the Shema at all…

Traditional Jews recite the Sh’ma three times in a regular day, including at bedtime. Lately, Jewish parents of all flavors have begun adding a bedtime Sh’ma to their routine. Reciting the Sh’ma right before bed is a sweet way to inject Jewishness into a kid’s life. It may seem a small step, but the timing makes it a big one. Bedtime is the vulnerable transition when kids are tired but receptive. They move from from waking to sleep, from together to alone, from light to Continue reading

Making Bedtime Jewish for Little Kids

use old toys to re-enact Jewish stories at bathtime

use old toys to re-enact Jewish stories at bathtime

BEDTIME HAPPENS.

Make it Jewish by adding a thing or two.
Find what fits for you.

From the end of supper to the last kiss goodnight, we can add Jewish content to our routines. Ending the day Jewishly is a powerful influence in making our kids who they are.
Add books, toys, loveys, songs, conversation, and a version of the traditional Sh’ma prayer as you see fit.  (See the Sh’ma suggestions and printable at the bottom of this page.) Continue reading