Tag Archives: seder plate

Quick Seder Plate for kids

the plate design is copyrighted, so I can't share it

printable sandwiched between 2 plates

Another 30-min.-or-less seder-centric project.  The goal: a seder plate kids create and then actually use.  These can get wet and wiped (but not submerged). Continue reading

Where has the Target Jew stuff gone?

Target seder plate 2012

Target seder plate 2012

You know those cute and cheap Target Passover dishes we’ve loved for the past few years?  Remember how happy we were to see them displayed in our favorite secular store?  Hebrew letters, right there on the endcap.  We were surprised and grateful and we whipped out the RED Cards and bought.

So, where’s the stuff this year?  Facebook and email friends report zilch.  Have you seen anything at your local store? Continue reading

Mini Seder Plate (polymer clay) for doll tables and human earlobes

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setting the Seder Plate

Continue reading

LEGO Seder Plates, life-size

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LEGO Seder Plate

The LEGO minifigs are jealous.  This time, we’ve made a seder plate sized for the big people. Continue reading

Mini Edible Seder Plate

Mini, edible seder plate

Mini, edible seder plate

Do we eat the foods on a real seder plate?  Nope.  But we can eat this seder plate snack—even the plate. Continue reading

Hub Cap Seder Plate

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Hub Cap Seder Plate.  Is it the first?  What with all the upcycled hubcaps online, I’m surprised.  I see bird baths, bird feeders, wall clocks, yard art, but no seder plates. Then again, a Venn diagram of Jewish + DIY + Automotive Enthusiast would not reveal much of an overlap.   Continue reading

Teaching the Seder Plate: Real Symbolic Foods

Charoset-making station

Charoset-making station

You don’t have to make a seder plate in order to use the heck out of it as a fabulous, hands-on reference point to this fabulous, hands-on holiday of Passover.  You just need a seder plate—any seder plate—and the stuff that goes on it.

The real objects depicted on a plate are weird and wonderful.  Intentionally so.  A horseradish root?  How often does that show up on the kitchen table, and how often does a kid get to grate the thing?  Charoset is weird, a naked bone is weird.  A boiled egg is not so weird, but it can be if you scorch  Continue reading

Target seder plate for 2012: with friendly tweak

Target seder plate 2012

Target + Passover + Hebrew = an unlikely triangulation.  Of course I bought Target’s five dollar seder plate last year, and of course I bought this year’s version the instant it appeared.

As if I need more seder plates. I have so many each guest could have their own. Which reminds me of something I get asked every year: “it’s a plate, but we don’t eat or serve from it?”  Very confusing.  Seder plates just hold the symbolic foods so we can direct attention to each one when the haggadah tells us to.  Continue reading

Grow Your Own Maror (after Passover)

Grating horseradish root for Chain. No, the goggles don't help.

Grating horseradish root for Chain. No, the goggles don’t help.

Passover has passed.

Did you buy a big ol’ horseradish root at the grocery store for Maror this year?

Did you toss it on the compost heap yet?

Well, run right out and pull it back off.  You can use it to grow a new one for next year’s seder. Even a small piece should take root just fine. Your kid can help you, and then proudly claim ownership at Passover.

HOW WE CAN USE IT WITH KIDS

Horseradish satisfies two places on a seder plate: Maror and Chazeret. Traditionally, a piece of the whole root is best for the Maror, while the Chazeret can be an “adulterated” version of horseradish (see next paragraph) or a bitter lettuce like Romaine. Chazeret is fine to use for the Korech step of the seder (aka the Hillel sandwich).

A much more satisfying way to refer to adulterated Maror is chrain.  Chrain/chrein is Russian for horseradish, but it means the grated kind. Use it plain as a condiment or add vinegar or beet juice. I prefer the plain, as vinegar seems to turn it a weird shade of turquoise at the edges. Either way, the potency is fleeting, so don’t plan on Continue reading

Seder Plates by Target

Seder plate at Target: cheap and cute

At Target yesterday I found an endcap full of seder dishes. This discrepant event was so discrepant I almost didn’t believe it. Five bucks for a large, melamine seder plate with shallow depressions for each symbol, and with the English and Hebrew name for each.

Hebrew at Target?

And for $1.99 you can get a coordinating square matzah plate with just the three little Hebrew letters that spell matzah.

So very surprised and happy.  Maybe melamine isn’t the earth’s friendliest material, but I am overlooking this fact in favor of the bigger fact that Target is selling dishes for my holiday.

Maybe this is a yearly occurrence where you come from, but not around here.

Todah rabah, Target.