Category Archives: Edible Craft

Tootsie Torahs (and how not to make them)

Tootsie Torah 2

I Googled “Tootsie Torahs” and came up nil, so I named this post to correct the Internet’s oversight.

Candy Torahs are a thing, I know, and can be ordered in bulk, kosher and trayfe, with personalized wrappers. They are party favors.

I don’t do party favors.  Or so I thought.  Yet, I ended up on my floor, alone, fiddling with hundreds of 3″ Tootsie Rolls.  Worse, no one (else) learned anything from this project, the Torahs are way less cute that they were in the Pinterest Board that lives in my head, and they are destined to be gobbled at a buffet that will again yield no educative outcome. Continue reading

Edible Menorah in a Window

The ol’ Pretzel Stick Menorah is a quick and easy activity for a class or party. It’s educational, it’s fun, and you can eat it.

Lighting the menorah in a window

Lighting the menorah in a window

I did this last year with K through 3rd grade, and everyone loved it, which is a boast I wish I could make about all my lesson plans.  First, we turned off the lights and lit a real oil menorah, with blessings.  This put everyone in a receptive mood and gave a heads-up that there are such things as menorah blessings.  It also provided a real, working model of an object we were about to recreate with food, WHICH IS Continue reading

Edible Ten Commandments, update

Folks are asking about the chocolate Ten Commandment tablets from my Lag BaOmer post.  So easy, I promise.  And won’t they look splendid atop Mt. Sinai muffins?

ersatz chocolate

chocolate-esque candy bark

don't eat these

don’t eat these

 

I made plaster versions, too, for some of my little Israelites on our Lag baOmer Walk.  They had to “receive” the Ten Commandments at the mountain, right?  But I warn you Continue reading

Lag BaOmer activity: the Omer Walk

Lag B’Omer! Here’s a quick glimpse at what we did…

I wanted my K – 3 classes to “embody” the connection between Passover and Shavuot via the Counting of the Omer, to use their bodies to travel from Passover—where the Israelites became a Free Nation, to Shavuot—where the Israelites became a Holy Nation.

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view from the Sea of Reeds toward Lag b’Omer and Shavuot

First, we crossed the Sea of Reeds and became a Free Nation.  On the floor were 49 steps toward Mt. Sinai on the opposite side of the room.  See Mt. Sinai up there, far away? Continue reading

Edible mini bonfire for Lag Ba’Omer

Edible fire for Lag Ba'Omer

Edible fire for Lag Ba’Omer

Here’s a quick snack-tivity for Lag Ba’Omer, and believe me, I need quick.   My Sunday classes are about 25 minutes each, including setup and cleanup, but this little project can bag one Lag Ba’Omer tradition in 5-10 minutes, tops.   Continue reading

Mini Edible Seder Plate

Mini, edible seder plate

Mini, edible seder plate

Do we eat the foods on a real seder plate?  Nope.  But we can eat this seder plate snack—even the plate. Continue reading

Meatloaf Menorah

MeatloafMenorhcandles1 text
Mmmmmmm, a menorah made of meat, in honor of the Shabbat during Hanukkah.

Actually, I made two:
1) a free-standing meatloaf menorah, and
2) a flat, branched meatloaf menorah (see below). Continue reading

Tangram Dreidel Toast

tangram dreidel toast

tangram dreidel toast

A tangram toast dreidel may prove to be my least popular post, but as I tell my children, you gotta be you, even if no one wants to be around the you you gotta be. Continue reading

A new SPIN on Edible Dreidels: Caramel Dreidel

Carameldreidel1

caramel dreidel

I give you an edible dreidel that actually spins.  It shares the chief values of the marshmallow dreidel and my mini-marshmallow dreidels—values which lie in the building, the writing upon (with food-safe markers) and the eating.  To these attractions, the caramel dreidel adds the bonus of spin. Continue reading

Hanukkah Carnival Stations

Sufganiyah on a String

Sufganiyah on a String (the doughnuts aren’t here yet)

We set up for the big ol’ Chanukah Carnival today (my synagogue’s spelling, not mine), and I’m posting the pics below so you can see a few of the stations. Continue reading

Instant Edible Sukkah: step by step photos

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Apparently, I have more to say about the Edible Sukkah. The big thing is that most folks skip the first and crucial step: to “glue” (with frosting, Nutella, whatever) a floor cracker to the plate. This anchors the whole structure, it gives the walls something to stick to, and it significantly reduces the frustration factor for little kids.  Building a sukkah should be a treat, not a trial. Continue reading

Nearly instant Hamantaschen: for dorm, class or slacker home

There is no substitute for slow food, and for making slow food slowly with kids.  Yada, yada, yada all the practical life experience and developmental skills: fine motor, following directions, reading, math, geometry, sequencing,
vocabulary, etc. etc.  Make it Jewish holiday slow food and you’ve got a content-rich, unforgettable Jewish education lesson plan.

Like Hamantaschen. There is a world of slow Hamantaschen recipes out there:  the soft, the crunchy, Continue reading

Edible Bowl for Tu B’Shevat Fruit (100% tree fruit outside and in)

coconut topping, tree nuts, fruit fresh and dried

Last fall, I wrote about the kid-version of edible apple bowls used as a Rosh Hashanah honey dish. Apple bowls are easy to adapt for Tu B’Shevat. You and your child can hollow an apple—the paradigmatic tree fruit—and fill it with tree fruit salad. It’s easy with Continue reading

Edible Hebrew: Alef-Bet Playdough

Edible playdo ingredients

Buying corn syrup just feels wrong.  I usually go out of my way to avoid corn syrup in foods, so buying a full, glistening bottle of Karo on purpose is just weird.  Yesterday, I felt so conspicuous slipping it into my grocery cart, I might as well have been buying sex toys or country ham or People magazine.

It was worth it.  The nervous guilt at the cash register has faded, and the recipe for edible playdough—featuring corn syrup—worked just fine. Continue reading

Gelt S’mores (and a Hanukkah miracle)

Hanukkah Gelt S'more

Hanukkah lasts eight days, eight looooong days. Gelt S’mores help keep things lively.

And today being Christmas, Gelt S’mores also help cut the post-prandial greasiness from the lunch buffet lo mein.

Ours were made with Paskesz Continue reading

Dreidel Challah, Menorah Challah

menorah challah, dreidel challah

When Hanukkah and Shabbat coincide, the challah deserves a thematic tweak.  The preschooler and I made a big Menorah Challah and a few little Dreidels.

We learned that using food dye to color the “flames” orange is not worth the trouble.  After the challah is baked, the food color merges with the golden egg wash.  But it was fun to try, and now we have orange palms for the rest of the day. Continue reading

Edible Dreidels

The classic Marshmallow Dreidel, with my mini version for older kids.

Marshmallow dreidels, regular and mini

Marshmallow dreidels, regular and mini

Bump up the educatainment value with a food-safe marker and a guide to writing the 4 Hebrew letters (name of letter, what it stands for in Hebrew and English).  Bump it up even more and make an Israeli dreidel for contrast: in Israel they use a Pey instead of a Shin. See below.)

Don’t you dare make these yourself and hand them out to kids.  The whole point of edible Jewish crafts is that the kids do the making.  You can be there, preferably, since another whole point of edible Jewish crafts is spending time together making Jewish things. Continue reading

Instant Edible Torah Scroll

Edible Torah: pretzel rods, fruit leather, Rolos.

Edible Torah: pretzel rods, fruit leather, Rolos.

Simchat Torah starts Thursday night. The “Rejoicing of the Torah” is a happy holiday, not surprisingly. Every week, Jews read a portion (parsha or sidra in Hebrew) from the Torah, and no matter which schedule we follow, we all finish and begin again on Simchat Torah.  The moment the reader chants the last word of Deuteronomy and then the first word of Genesis is one of the highlights of the liturgical year.  What are the last and first words?  See below.*

At synagogue on Simchat Torah, there is plenty to keep the kids engaged and happy, especially at the evening service.  Flag-waving, candy-scarfing kids can also carry toy Torahs on the noisy processionals (hakafot); beat kosher rhythm Continue reading

Instant Edible Sukkah: easy tips for the disorganized or spontaneous

top view of child-made edible sukkah with Nitwit candies

Here are a few easy tips about making an edible sukkah from graham crackers and pretzel sticks.  Way easier than my meticulous post with step-by-step instructions and photos from two years ago:  Make a Kosher Edible Sukkah for the obsessively organized.

Construction: Honey Maid graham crackers are ideal.  They break evenly into squares just the right size for building a cube sukkah on a dessert plate. Use the whole rectangle (5″ long) if you are building on a dinner-size paper plate. Yes, they are kosher. Buy a bunch and use them for Sukkot s’mores later. Generic brands crumble when they break, and you will end up with a box full of rejects.

Roof: Snyder’s Pretzel Sticks (kosher) are the perfect length to span a Honey Maid Graham Cracker cube sukkah.  Not rods or dippers, but Sticks.  This year, I could only find them packaged in individual, 100 calorie bags.  If you build a sukkah Continue reading

Edible Whales for Yom Kippur

Jonah and the Whale

Yes, I know we don’t eat during Yom Kippur, but kids do, and my kid will be eating these.  As will all the children at my syagogue’s young family service, right after they crawl through the Belly of the Whale (a play tunnel).

Kveller.com just published my post about repurposing a store-bought snack into an instant, Jewish holiday food.

I invite you to read it at Kveller: “A Whale of a Snack for Yom Kippur.”  And, if it passes muster (or mustard), can you “like” it there, please, so that Kveller will know someone is reading it?

Meanwhile, there is still time to buy a bag of Bugles for another “Jewish” snack: edible shofars. Continue reading